Requirements Realization Views

One of the most essential but often overlooked views to have on architecture is requirements realization. This blog explores this subject and one way we can work with them.

I show one way of working with Requirements Realization Views – Its not the only way. Doing this can save huge amounts of time and money by avoiding a need to redo things.

If you have read ISO 42010 the International standard for architecture description, you will know that every architecture view is intended to frame the concerns of its stakeholders.

Architecture isn’t about drawing pictures. Whist defining a view of technology is important, it is more important is understanding the reason why. We learn this in math class as children. The answer to a math question gives you points, but you also get points for showing work.

The Requirements realization view is one way to show how a solution meets the needs of its stakeholders.

I show below some example views and one way of working that can be used with BiZZdesign’s Enterprise Studio. Its the tool I use most often, so I leverage some of its benefits in my workflow. All the things I show can be done with other tools, some tools make this easier than others.

An Example View

Figure 1 – Requirements Realization View

The example above is a basic requirements realization view. Its at a high level – its showing that a product is meeting several requirements. The level of detail we go to depends very much on the benefit it would provide. The view in figure 1 – may serve as a good introduction to anyone wishing to understand the design from the Web Hosting Product. For the purposes of a high level introduction to business stakeholders that might be enough, but how do we know what is above is true?

The next level of detail

Each of the requirements in figure 1 is obviously a collection of other requirements – I might define them in architect, or I might just reference another source. For example – business unit requirements may exist and be managed in a system like Confluence. This might be a more accessible place for stakeholders to manage them if we do not want to go though the trouble of teaching everyone ArchiMate.

The next level of detail in ArchiMate

Personally, I do not always ask for everyone to go to the next level of detail in ArchiMate, because in a complex project with many moving parts it doesn’t always make sense, especially when you have different architects at different levels of maturity, especially when you have several thousands of requirements in a project

That said, there are advantages to mapping your requirements in Archimate. I know one or two architects that do it.

Using Enterprise Studio

Here tools can set you apart. Importing requirements from excel into an architecture model can be fairly easy in some tools. I am using BiZZdesigns Enterprise Studio (BES). – which makes it easy to import and update requirements if I create them using New > Multiple – I can then copy and paste in from excel. I could have done this other ways too and its probably worth the time taken to do that.. You end up with a lot of requirements on a view like this:

Figure 2 – Requirements

You might think in this case that this isn’t very helpful – its just a bunch of numbers – but what i did was import the requirement ID’s as names and I put the actual descriptions in the description or documentation field. In this way when I have many requirements I can make them smaller and more manageable on screen.

To actually see detail of each requirement I can switch on tooltips – so the documentation pops up when I mouse-over the requirement, or I can use labels.

Figure 3 – A requirement labelled.

So why bother?

Once I have the requirements on my canvas i can group them together – to organised them in different ways for different stakeholders. Something like in figure 4:

Figure 4 – Grouping Requirements

When I have done the above in big projects I have sometimes identified requirements that are not managed at all. In the example above you can easily see uncategorized requirements. They are not connected to anything and can easily be forgotten. Just by itself it makes the pain of the exercise worth while. I can also at this point prioritize them and then I normally take these requirements and connect them into a series of implementation and migration views.

Every requirement needs to be realized some how. I can pretty easily either script, or create a property table in Enterprise Studio to see requirements that are not realizing things as an extra level of validation. If we have mapped our requirements into groups, and created views for each group, then we should easily be able to see things that are not realized anyway. Back in figure 4 we did our mapping, and as a result of the mapping for example we may have decided to have 5 realization views:

  • Customer Requirements Realization View
  • Architecture NFR Realization View
  • Security NFR Realization View
  • Business Unit Requirements Realization View
  • Orphaned Requirements Realization View

Mapping Requirements to the Realization

Now with the prep work completed we get to the important part. Our Customer Requirements Realization View might look like something in figure 5.

Figure 5 – Customer Requirements Realization

Lets look closer at figure 5.

The standard web hosting solution

I make use of the grouping element in ArchiMate to represent architecture building blocks. Its enables me to keep things neat – I could have course have hidden this level of detail in another view & just connected in the Web Hosting Product. In this case I felt the services create value. I do not need the detail to know exactly which servers are being used but I can tell that this will be an Azure hosted solution, running on Linux. If you read my blog on services, you should at this point start to see the value of hiding architecture behind the externally facing services.

Standard Services Contract

Some requirements are covered by our standard products and some by our standard agreements. To use the ISO 42010 language again – Its important to see that concerns are all framed within one or more viewpoints. This means even if its obvious to us that something is covered in the standard contract we should state it. What is obvious to me is not necessarily obvious to a coworker.

Customer CRM

Of course I could put as much or as little detail as I need into this view. I am telling a story, which I talk about in my Improving Archimate Modelling Blog. The important thing to remember is that all requirements need to be realized in a view, but again not always the same view. Because we are telling a story we need to be consistent with the level of detail.

Locking Down Requirements

Before starting requirements realization its important to have requirements management under control. Its a separate subject, but you need to ensure that requirements are not significantly changing during a project, or the workload significantly increases.Going through the process of redrafting your realization view will provide benefit and avoid confusion.

Some Common Challenges

I have sometimes seen requirements realization being missed as a step. Sometimes people just create a technical solution, and say “yes” that meets the requirements after a first read through, Then later they realize it doesn’t because they didn’t look to this level of detail and are forced to go through a very expensive exercise of fixing things.

I have also seen things mess up because requirements management is seen as being a project managers job. Yes, those guys are responsible to ensure requirements are met, but not how they are met. I see the job of organizing requirements in a way that makes sense to the solution as being an essential part of an architects job. If you look at the TOGAF ADM for example you will see requirements management at the heart of everything..Its partly a separate conversation but I would also encourage architects to work with project managers to organize requirements in a way that makes sense, because it makes requirements realization a lot easier and reduces risk,

Another common issue if focusing too much on customer requirements. Its really common for organizations to have a customer first approach – but this doesn’t mean we should not consider our own needs. Business requirements are important, as are the architecture and security ones for example. If we do not consider them, issues will occur later – because they are there to mitigate risk. Some non functional requirements will relate to documentation and I can easily create a view for architecture deliverable requirements realization. In projects architects should ensure time is given to manage non customer requirements.

Summing It Up

I cannot stress the importance of doing requirements realization. In this article i focused mostly on doing requirements realization in ArchiMate, but we can actually do it in other ways. I wrote about the challenges of Designing Architecture Through Document Templates before – I personally try to avoid that for the reasons I state in that blog.

Requirements show us “what” needs to be done by “who”, and “when”. Requirements Realization shows us “how”. This is a message I think all architects should take to heart and communicate out to other stakeholders.

Yes, running through thousands of requirements can be boring but taking the time to properly manage and realize them can result in very high quality work. Requirements Realization can be cool.